Vegan Daughter Paleo Son

Jamaican Bammies

Bammies3 E1430853520181

Jamaican Bammies

Looking for something cool to do with yuca (aka cassava or manioc)? How about simple crispy Jamaican Bammies? Versions of this recipe are all over the blogosphere, so finding who to credit for this method is difficult. Apparently this recipe is either a frequently copied recipe or a frequently used recipe, making it pretty standard. In any event, to follow is my slant, respecting tradition.

Yuca a very starchy, dough-like root that is acceptable in moderation in paleo diets. As the plant from which tapioca comes, it is a great replacer ingredient for gluten-free diners. Bammies are almost bread-like. This recipe is more potato-cake-like, because the grated root is not grounded into a flour. Feel free to dry and grind it, if you like! Traditionally, they are eaten with fried fish in Jamaica, the way that cornbread is enjoyed with fish in the southern and midwest U.S. But they could also work as a side for a vegetarian dinner, or even as a gluten-free pizza crust!

jamaican bammies

How to make Bammies

Wash and peel yuca. I like to cut it into large pieces, stand them on their ends, and run my knife down them to remove peel. Yuca contains toxins, most of which are in the peel. Get rid of the peel.

yuccapeelchop1

Grate yuca, using the smallest holes on the grater. It will smell like almonds in your kitchen. Delightful! But also deadly. There is cyanide in the juice. It is important that you cook this food thoroughly! There are also soaking methods which render bitter cassava safe.

This is not a raw foods diet food.

yuccagrated1

You will end up with a big mound.

yuccagrated2

Over a bowl to collect the juices, wrap grated yuca in cheesecloth or a clean cotton towel. Squeeze to remove as much juice as possible. You can juice a little at a time if you like. It is easier than trying to juice the whole batch. Really man-handle this yuca to get out as much of those toxic juices as you possibly can!

yuca_cheesecloth2

Fermentation

Option: At this point, you can soak the yuca in water and set it in a cool dark place to slightly ferment. This is a very good idea and a standard practice for a more thorough removal of toxins. It also gives the yuca a slightly acidic flavor. Allow yuca to soak for 3 days, changing the water once each day.

I like the soaking method because it allows you to prepare yuca in advance and cook it up later. I love a good make-ahead! When you are ready to use it, you will drain it and dry it thoroughly with a clean towel or paper towels. You can even spread it on a cookie sheet and gently dry it further in the oven.

If you are feeling very industrious, you can grab your mortar and pestle, beat this down to a fine paste, dry it, and turn it into a powder. (tapioca flour)

yucasqueezed1

Either reserve liquid to make Cassareep, or discard. Do not consume liquid raw! It is toxic raw.

yucajuice1

This yuca is not fermented. We will want to cook it very well!

Add salt to the grated and squeezed yuca. Combine well and break up lumps.

yucasqueezed2

yucasalted1

Divide grated yuca into 2 equal parts.

yucaonecup1

Heat a very lightly oiled frying pan to about a medium temperature. (I like cast iron)

When the pan is hot, add one half of the yuca to the middle.

bammycook1

Spread and shape the mound until it is about 1/2 inch thick.

bammycook2

Cook until set and golden brown, carefully flip the cake, and brown the other side. Set aside and repeat with the other half.

bammycook3

Set your bammies aside.

When you are ready to fry your bammies…

Pour the coconut milk into a shallow dish. Cover the bammies in coconut oil and allow them to sit for 5-10 minutes. I like to do this one at a time, for easier handling.

bammysoak1

bammysoak2

bammysoak3

Heat cooking oil in a skillet, enough oil for frying, about 1/4 – 1/2 inch.

When oil is hot, carefully place a bammy into the pan and cook until browned. If oil does not cover the bammy, flip it over to brown both sides.

bammyfry1

bammyfry2

Place on a rack or on paper towels to drain.

Alternatively, you can bake the bammies, lightly oiled (or buttered) on each side, in a preheated 350º oven for about 15 minutes.

jamaican bammies

Traditional Jamaican Bammies

This is a quick traditional method for making bammies. The texture will be more like a potato cake than a bread. If you ferment, pound, and dry the yuca, you can make your bammies more bread-like. But I would still use this as a gluten-free pizza crust, as-is.

Ingredients

  • fresh yuca, aka cassava or manioc
  • salt to taste
  • 1 – 2 cups coconut milk (or enough to cover bammies)
  • cooking oil (I like coconut)

Make the Bammies

  1. Wash and peel yuca
  2. Grate yuca, using the smallest holes on the grater
  3. Over a bowl to collect the juices, wrap grated yuca in cheesecloth or a clean cotton towel. Squeeze to remove as much juice as possible. Either reserve liquid to make Cassacreep, or discard. Do not consume liquid raw!
  4. Option: If you are going to soak and ferment yuca, you can do so at this stage. In a bowl, cover yuca with water, place in a cool.dry place. Allow to soak for 3 days, changing out the water each day. Drain and thoroughly dry yuca.
  5. Add salt to the grated and squeezed yuca. Combine well and break up lumps.
  6. Divide grated yuca into 2 equal parts.
  7. Heat a very lightly oiled frying pan to about a medium temperature. (I like cast iron)
  8. When the pan is hot, add one half of the yuca to the middle. Spread and shape the mound until it is about 1/2 inch thick.
  9. Cook until set and golden brown, carefully flip the cake, and brown the other side. Set aside and repeat with the other half.

When you are ready to fry your bammies…

  1. Pour the coconut milk into a shallow dish. Cover the bammies in coconut oil and allow them to sit for 5-10 minutes. I like to do this one at a time, for easier handling.
  2. Heat cooking oil in a skillet, enough oil for frying, about 1/4 – 1/2 inch.
  3. When oil is hot, carefully place a bammy into the pan and cook until browned. If oil does not cover the bammy, flip it over to brown both sides.
  4. Place on a rack or on paper towels to drain.

Alternatively, you can bake the bammies, lightly oiled (or buttered) on each side, in a preheated 350º oven for about 15 minutes.

Serve immediately. Traditionally, these are eaten with fried fish, or a vegetable dish like Callaloo.

Important Note: Cook yuca thoroughly! Discard the juice unless you cook it down completely. If yuca is eaten raw, it is toxic!

Enjoy!

If you like this, please Pin, Share, and Like

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: